JustForex

Home / Auto / UK speeding fines increased this year, but do you REALLY know how fast you should go?
HF Master Card

UK speeding fines increased this year, but do you REALLY know how fast you should go?


Speed limits are one of the biggest contributors to road safety in the UK. 

They have been picked to reflect the risk, danger or environment that the road is surrounded by to ensure both the safety of the driver, passengers and pedestrians. 

However, not everyone enamoured with the speed limits with some frustrated by the 70mph motorway limit or the pesky 20mph zones. 

Regardless of your which side you take with speed limits they are completely unavoidable and integral to driving so being aware of them is of the utmost importance. 

While it is one of the things you have to learn as part of your driving theory test it can be easy for this information to slip out of consciousness after years on the road. 

In the Highway Code the speed limit is described as the “absolute maximum – it doesn’t mean it’s safe to drive at this speed in all conditions.” 

Additionally road speeds can change over time and perhaps these iterations are not as well publicised as they should be.

Another factor to consider is how these limits differ between different vehicle types and in different circumstances. 

For example restrictions for a car with a trailer aren’t the same as those for a van. 

Here is a list of what limits and restrictions are currently in place in the UK, which drivers are required to abide by: 

Cars, motorcycles, car-derived vans and dual-purpose vehicles

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h)

———————————————

Cars, motorcycles, car-derived vans and dual-purpose vehicles when towing caravans or trailers

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

———————————————

Motorhomes or motor caravans (not more than 3.05 tonnes maximum unladen weight)

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h)

———————————————

MotorwayGETTY

Certain vehicles and roads have different limitations and restrictions

Motorhomes or motor caravans (more than 3.05 tonnes maximum unladen weight)

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h)

———————————————

Buses, coaches and minibuses (not more than 12 metres overall length)

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)Dual carriageways mph (km/h):

Motorways mph (km/h):

———————————————

Buses, coaches and minibuses (more than 12 metres overall length)

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 70 mph (112km/h), 60 mph (96 km/h) if articulated or towing a trailer

———————————————

Goods vehicles (not more than 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h):70 mph (112km/h)

———————————————

Goods vehicles (more than 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight) in England and Wales

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

Motorways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

———————————————

Goods vehicles (more than 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight) in Scotland

Built-up areas mph(km/h): 30 mph (48km/h)

Single carriageways mph (km/h): 40 mph (64 km/h)

Dual carriageways mph (km/h): 50 mph (80 km/h

Motorways mph (km/h): 60 mph (96 km/h)

It should be noted that local councils can set their own speed limits in certain areas, and these must be clearly signed.

—————

Variable speed limits 

Variable speed limits are being increasingly used across Britain and are typically used on ‘smart motorways’.

These speed limits are monitored and altered to improve traffic flow. 

For example they can be altered if there is congestion up ahead or in case of an accident or road works. 

They are in place on many of the UK’s busiest motorways including the M6, M25 and M1 and carry the same penalty as a regular speed limit.

—————

motorwayGETTY

Speeding fines increased this year but do you know the limit

How can I be punished for breaking the speed limit? 

Speeding fines in the UK changed earlier this year which saw the maximum a driver can be charged dramatically increase.

The cap of £1,000 on minor speeding offences or up to £2,500 for major ones still remains but the way the fine is calculated did increase. 

The minimum penalty for an offence is £100 fine and three penalty points added to you licence.

You could be disqualified ion you build up 12 or more penalty points over a three year period unless you are a new driver when it is under six points. 

Under the new rules drivers can be charged up to 175 per cent of their weekly wage. 

Speed cameraGETTY

The cap of £1,000 on minor speeding offences or up to £2,500 for major ones

Charges are broken down into three different bands which determine how a motorist is fined and are calculated on a percentage basis. 

A minor offence constitutes a band A charge. Band A charges are for drivers who exceed the stated speed limit between one and 10mph. 

So, if a driver travels 31mph up to 40mph in a 30mph zone, they can be charged between 25 per cent and 75 per cent of their weekly income. 

Drivers who exceed the stated speed limit between 11mph and 20mph will be charged between 75 per cent and 125 per cent of their wage.

Major offences which are for breaches of 22mph and above could see drivers charged between 125 per cent and 175 per cent of their weekly wage. 

Variable amounts of penalty points can also be issued based on the offence. 

Band A offenders can receive three penalty points on their licence, band B drivers can land themselves between four and six points, while band C offences carry a six penalty point charge.

For any motorist who has held their licence for less than two years, a band C offence is enough for them to loose their licence and face an immediate driving ban. 



Source link

About admin

Check Also

Adolf Hitler's armour-plated Mercedes-Benz set to fetch MILLIONS at auction

SWNS Adolf Hitler’s 1939 Mercedes-Benz is set to sell for millions at auction next week ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

<a href="http://www.instaforex.com/?x=GKM">InstaForex</a>